Skip to content

It is a desperate and helpless feeling when you are made a victim of an auto accident. But what may make this matter all the more frustrating is if you discover that the at-fault driver was negligent by driving distractedly. Continue reading to learn how to prove your distracted driving injury claim and how one of the experienced Bergen County auto accident attorneys at McNerney & McAuliffe can help you gather this information.

What are the common causes of a distracted driving accident?

Driving is a serious task that requires a driver’s complete concentration. This is because a driver must remain attentive to all traffic signs and symbols; be mindful of neighboring automobiles they share the roads with; and quickly react to any external hazards that appear on the roads; among other things. Ultimately, even the slightest distraction may lead to some sort of collision. Without further ado, the most common ways in which a distracted driving accident may arise read as follows:

  • The driver may have been eating or drinking while behind the wheel.
  • The driver may have been talking or texting on their cell phone while behind the wheel.
  • The driver may have been turning around to speak with passengers while behind the wheel.
  • The driver may have been adjusting radio controls or other car controls while behind the wheel.
  • The driver may have been reaching for something in the glove compartment while behind the wheel.
  • The driver may have been looking in the rearview mirror to apply makeup or fix hair while behind the wheel.

What can I do to prove my distracted driving injury claim?

You may have seen with your own eyes that the at-fault driver was distracted in the moments leading up to your collision. But your word will only go so far in your distracted driving injury claim. This means that you must collect a sufficient amount of proof that points to their driving distractedly. Examples of relevant pieces of proof are as follows:

  • Photos and videos of the at-fault driver’s automobile after the collision (for example, if you claim they were applying makeup, photos of makeup products in their cupholders or on their seat).
  • An accident report in which a law enforcement officer offers their opinion as to who/what caused the collision.
  • A statement by a witness who saw the at-fault driver distracted in the moments leading up to the collision.
  • A statement by the at-fault driver in which they admit their wrongdoing, if possible to retrieve.

It may take a lot of time and commitment to follow through with your distracted driving injury claim. But if you hire one of the skilled Bergen County personal injury attorneys, a lot of this burden will be taken off your shoulders. So reach out to McNerney & McAuliffe today.

Read Our Latest Blog Posts

  Can I Collect Compensation for Medical Bills in an Injury Claim?

In the immediate hours following your personal injury accident, you may find yourself in the emergency room, with an overnight…

Read More
  What Does a Prenuptial Agreement Include?

In the unfortunate event of divorce, your established prenuptial agreement may offer you great protections that promote a fair and…

Read More